Saturday, 3 July 2021

Six on Saturday - 3rd July 2021

 We have had a little rain, but if I had not wartered yesterday, I would have had to water today.  In this gardener's parlance, sufficient to make it comfortable for the slugs and snails.

1. In view of the forecast for rain overnight, I decided it was time to harvest the garlic.  It will be in, out, in out, with them dogging the rain, until they are cured, and can be stored away.


2. In its fourth year of flowering this Dianthus, which could be Dianthus Chinensis has been a great spot of red drawing the eye beyond the gravel garden.


3. Just pipping the marjorams this lovely variegated Eryngium Bourgatii: Mediterranean Sea Holly is also the first of the eryngiums to start the season. It is in the middle of picture here and works nicely with purple creeping thyme and Marjoram Kent beauty at its feet, and Geranium Elke elbowing through. Because the garden is small everything is tight packed, so much snipping goes on throughout the season.


4. At the end of this section a low growing plant: I call everything low growing an alpine, the AGS will probably bar me should they every read that comment. Stachys Ukkie has rose purple flower spikes and interesting textured leaves.

5. Our current lunch table pot is this little Rodohypoxis Pintado. I usually have a few pots on the blue table, which get moved off when the cloth goes on for lunch.  Mr S put this one back on as he knew I loved looking at this one. From the first two commentators, I gather there is some interest in Rodohyposis.  Here is a link to some useful cultural tips: https://www.rareplantfair.co.uk/news-and-articles/rhodohypoxis/ .  Tale Valley Nurseries hold the National Collection.

Rodohypoxis Pintado

6. Roses from cuttings, but with no name.  If anyone knows please pass on your suggestions.


8 comments:

  1. The Dianthus looks great - a lovely splash of deep red.

    I'm also rather taken the Rodohypoxis. I have one struggling along on the rockery - I wonder whether it might do better in a pot...

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    1. I've put a link to some cultural tips.

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  2. Superb Rodohypoxis Pintado that I didn't know ! I also harvested my garlic on Thursday and now everything is drying in the greenhouse ( too much rain outdoors... )

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    1. I only have a conservatory not a glasshouse, but that would be a little too strong for we use it so much. That is why I keep moving it in and out of the shed, though I have read, that there are best cured in the shade with good ventilation to make the bulbs keep a long time. Quite different to curing of onions.

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  3. Your borders are looking great as is your garlic. After two poor garlic harvests I didn't bother this time. I hope someone can identify that rose - it's a beauty.

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  4. I must look into rhodohypoxis as a possibility for growing in the Coop - looking at the link you gave, there are plenty of varieties around.

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    1. I had seen them in Botanic Gardens in their collections for some years, I also noticed that they were South African plants. As our weather warms up, collections and growers are introducing more and more to us.

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  5. Your garlic bulbs look most plump and healthy Noelle. I've not grown any this year but have done so in the past and always found it hard knowing just when to harvest . A lovely grouping round the eryngium.

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